Motorola Xoom comes under fire

Motorola Xoom Android TabletIf you are thinking of not buying an iPad then you may be in the market for something like the Motorola Xoom. However, before you hand over your hard-earned cash you may want to read this article by Michael J. Miller, respected blogger at PCMAG – Eight Things to Hate About the Motorola Xoom. In it he shares the things that worry him about the device (already having previously written a similar article about the “8 Things I like about the Motorola Xoom“.

Not wanting to just quote the article verbatim, let’s just say that he basically finds the device is not quite there yet, which says to me that Motorola have made the same mistake that numerous other companies have, they have tried to jump on board of Apple’s bandwagon and rushed out a product that is in no way an equal of the iPad (never mind the soon to be released iPad 2). In particular he points out that there is no Flash capability, only 16 apps are available, some of the phone apps don’t seem to work either and the SD slot isn’t functional.

Anyway, why not read both articles and make up your own mind or go straight to the full review by PCMag.

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Malware risk on unsecured WiFi networks

Security camera

Image via Wikipedia

It’s something I have mentioned previously but it’s worth reiterating…. using unsecured WiFi networks put you and your precious data at risk. This is true not just when connecting to such networks via your laptop whilst on the move. It’s just as true when using your smartphone or iPad or iPod Touch, indeed any of the various types of devices that come with a WiFi ability.

“Consumers need to realize that mobiles, whether smartphone or tablet, are mini computers,” said David Gorodyansky, CEO of AnchorFree. “This means all the vulnerabilities of a computer exist, often with a less-protected OS.”

For companies and individuals, smartphone access should be a concern when that access is via unsecured mobile networks. For banks and e-commerce sites in particular, as well as consumers,  security has become much more important now than ever before.

So, what steps can you take to protect yourself? Well, just like when using your normal PC, don’t click on links in unsolicited emails (known as ‘phishing’ emails) and don’t respond to emails that you weren’t expecting, or from sources you hadn’t signed up to and certainly don’t click on links asking you to verify your logon details, in particular ones claiming to be from your bank.

Be wary of emails that come from social networks such as Facebook, MySpace and the likes of Twitter, especially if it’s not from any of your regular contacts. Spam is a real problem at the moment with these and there are numerous scams going around the social networking world at the moment.

It’s good advice to never give out personal information via email, smartphone or on the Web, and always verify independently  any unknown text or email message, game, application or security update.

Don’t logon in the first place to an unsecured network and instead use security all the time, using a VPN to encrypt and secure your browsing.

For more on the risks of malware on wifi and other networks read http://www.technewsworld.com/story/71816.html

You may also want to check out these excellent security sites:

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Os redefines Wi-Fi with launch of Os WiFi

A diagram showing a possible WI-FI network.

Image via Wikipedia

O2 outlined it’s plans recently to offer seamless, fast and free internet for all, in venues across the country. Here is what it said in it’s Press Release:

“O2 announces it’s plans to deploy a market-changing public Wi-Fi platform in the UK, with the launch of O2 Wifi. O2’s premium hotspots will be managed through partnerships with key venue owners and will be open for all customers to access for free, no matter which mobile or broadband provider they are with. O2 is aiming to create a scaled Wi-Fi platform that will be at least double the number of premium hotspots currently offered by BT Openzone and The Cloud combined by 2013.

It will begin rollout immediately by replacing its existing 450 Cloud hotspots in its retail and office estate. It will continue to extend the reach and scale of O2 Wifi through partnerships with strategic venues, to include shops, restaurants, retail outlets and outdoor and indoor locations across the UK. The O2 Wifi service will address the many shortcomings of current public Wi-Fi offerings by being genuinely free to customers, simple, fast and secure. O2’s mobile expertise and insight, allied with an enhanced quality of network connectivity and strong venue partnerships will now deliver a significantly enhanced user experience.

O2 Wifi will introduce a new level of customer engagement, driving increased value for both the Wi-Fi hosting venue and the user by bringing together O2 Wifi with the capabilities of O2 Media and O2 Money to offer the potential to deliver relevant timely content that customers want in a format that suits them. Access to the hotspots will be through a simple sign-up process and will be free to both O2 and non-O2 mobile customers, providing seamless connectivity to a high quality network. The sign up process will be auto provisioned for all O2 customers with Wi-Fi devices by the end of the year.

All hotspots will be premium public hotspots, as opposed to using residential connections with limited bandwidth. O2 has long been a market-leader in provision of public Wi-Fi services across mobile devices, introducing unlimited Wi-Fi access included in iPhone tariffs over three years ago. Through O2’s partnerships with BT Openzone and The Cloud, adoption and growth of Wi-Fi services has been significant with customers seeing real usage benefits. O2’s New Business Development Director Tim Sefton said: “Building networks is a core capability. We have pioneered the explosion of mobile data over the last three years and know better than anyone where people are accessing data.

O2 Wifi hotspots will bring high quality public Wi-fi access to the majority of mobile users. “Only 20% of people who have access to free public Wi-Fi on O2 tariffs actively use it despite the majority of devices being Wi-Fi enabled. We know that Wi-Fi as a technology has great potential and can be a very fast service, however customers are discouraged by barriers which include complexity in activation, uncertainty of where Wi-Fi is free and the variable quality of the current experience. “O2 is integrating new layers of technology into the existing network to enable a seamless and sustained customer experience. We are technology-agnostic and driven entirely by our customers’ needs. We believe that services should be delivered in the best possible way, across multiple networks, supported by different technologies.” In addition, O2 is increasing investment in its mobile network by 25% in 2011.

These investments will allow O2 to offer customers access to a suite of layered technologies, including 2G, EDGE, 3G, 4G, HSPA+ and Wi-Fi, seamlessly, simply and at speed. These technologies will enable customers to access a new range of ‘smarter’ services and experiences. ”

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Thousands of UK Wi-Fi users still vulnerable to hackers

A diagram showing a possible WI-FI network.
Image via Wikipedia

It seems the message still isn’t getting across. A recent report by insurance firm CPP shows some 40,000 wi-fi networks across the UK could be easily hacked, often within a few seconds. What’s most shocking about this finding is that almost half of them had no password at all – that’s nearly 20,000!

These networks are vulnerable to even the most inept hacker. With little more than a laptop, a wireless connection and some easily obtained software all of these networks could be hacked and the owner wouldn’t even know it. That means if they are using their internet connection to do online banking that they could find their logons stolen, followed soon after by their cash. They are also vulnerable to having their online identity stolen, their computers taken over and turned into zombies spewing forth spam and sending more viruses and Trojans around the net.

Another surprising finding of the research is that 82% of those interviewed thought their networks were secure. This just underlines the fact that most of the public have little understanding about Wi-Fi security and are oblivious to the risks they are facing. When one considers that Wi-Fi is very common now on smartphones and other devices (iPods and iPads for example) then this is a very worrying situation indeed. Its difficult to know what can be done about it too as most of the public develop a glazed look whenever you try and explain Wi-Fi security through the use of WPA2 security etc.

One solution would be for manufacturers to design devices with automatic security configuration and the SSID and wireless keys stuck on a label on the device. SKY do this with some of their routers so it’s possible to do it. Until all Wi-Fi devices come automatically configured with WPA2 encryption however, it’s down to the end-user to educate themselves and make sure their devices and networks in general are all properly secured.

Check out my post here for some tips on how to do this. I intend to write another post on how to secure your Wi-Fi network step by step so keep visiting.

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Growth of Wi-Fi to exceed 1.9 Billion devices by 2014

Novatel MiFi™ 2372 "Intelligent Mobile Wi...
Image via Wikipedia

Analysts are predicting that Wi-Fi devices will nearly reach the 2 Billion mark in 2014. Currently standing at around 500 million in 2009, this represents significant growth. It has been helped by the growing market for all sorts of wireless devices in the home, such as the X-Box, PS3 and Wii, together with the growth of Wi-Fi in mobile devices (such as smartphones and MiFi devices) and this is surely set to accelerate.

What, with the iPad and new tablets (or slates) and the growing numbers of wi-fi enabled e-book readers, who can argue with this assertion. I am inclined to say that even this will prove to be somewhat conservative when you consider the growth in the number of wi-fi hotspots around the world. Even digital cameras come with wi-fi connectivity these days and new gadgets are being added to cars almost every time a new model comes out.

See www.xbitlabs.com

If you need reliable wi-fi on the move then check out the Wi-Fire High Gain USB Adapter from hField.

If you are looking for short-term MiFi (Mobile Wi-Fi) whilst visiting the Uk at excellent rates then check us out at MiFiClub.

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